IMPORTANT NEWS - ALL USERS MUST UPDATE THEIR PASSWORD AFTER MARCH 1, 2019

On March 1, 2019, we made important updates to the security of this site in order to serve you better. As a result, ALL USERS will be required to reset their password upon login. You can do this by clicking the "Forgot your password" link on the login page of this website.

If you have difficulty receiving the email to reset your password, please check your spam folder and then contact us at 775-784-6265 or training@casat.org.

We appreciate your patience!

Upcoming Trainings

6 CEHs
In Person Training
Identifying and Selecting EBIs – Finding the Best Fit
Location: UNR Redfield Campus, 18600 Wedge Parkway, Reno, NV 89511
7/16/2019

This training is brought to you in collaboration with the Pacific Southwest Prevention Technology Transfer Center (HHS Region 9) Join the Pacific Southwest PTTC listserv: https://tinyurl.com/pspttc-listserv For general information, call toll-free: 1-833-9SW-PTTC Prevention leaders are dedicated to improving the health of their communities through the implementation of effective strategies to reduce substance misuse and related consequences. Perhaps the most critical decisions prevention staff weigh are what interventions to adopt and implement, typically with limited resources. Through participation in this full-day workshop, attendees will learn to identify and critically examine interventions that are not just effective but that also align closely with their unique community conditions and organizational strengths.

This training is brought to you in collaboration with the Pacific Southwest Prevention Technology Transfer Center (HHS Region 9) Join the Pacific Southwest PTTC listserv: https://tinyurl.com/pspttc-listserv For general information, call toll-free: 1-833-9SW-PTTC Prevention leaders are dedicated to improving the health of their communities through the implementation of effective strategies to reduce substance misuse and related consequences. Perhaps the most critical decisions prevention staff weigh are what interventions to adopt and implement, typically with limited resources. Through participation in this full-day workshop, attendees will learn to identify and critically examine interventions that are not just effective but that also align closely with their unique community conditions and organizational strengths.

4 CEHs
In Person Training
Is Medicare a Missed Opportunity In Nevada’s Behavioral Health System?
Location: UNR Cooperative Extension Southern Area, 8050 Paradise Road, Las Vegas 89123
7/18/2019

Nationwide, community behavioral health providers have not impacted Medicare beneficiaries to the extent they have for Medicaid enrollees. This has often left Medicare beneficiaries with low access to behavioral health care, despite recent policy changes designed to expand access to people with behavioral health conditions age 65 and over who are dual eligible. Evidence shows that Medicare beneficiaries often have high prevalence of behavioral health conditions, including depression, substance use disorders, bipolar disorders and schizophrenia. Addressing these needs is necessary to increase the quality of life and reduce health care costs. Learning Objectives: Assess whether Medicare enrollees with behavioral health conditions are underserved in Nevada; Identify barriers and describe several ways to overcome the barriers that may have decreased access to kept them away from meeting the behavioral health needs of Medicare enrollees; Identify several strategies behavioral health providers in Nevada can increase access to Medicare enrollees through their centers; Identify key activities to make services to Medicare enrollees sustainable for Nevada providers.

Nationwide, community behavioral health providers have not impacted Medicare beneficiaries to the extent they have for Medicaid enrollees. This has often left Medicare beneficiaries with low access to behavioral health care, despite recent policy changes designed to expand access to people with behavioral health conditions age 65 and over who are dual eligible. Evidence shows that Medicare beneficiaries often have high prevalence of behavioral health conditions, including depression, substance use disorders, bipolar disorders and schizophrenia. Addressing these needs is necessary to increase the quality of life and reduce health care costs. Learning Objectives: Assess whether Medicare enrollees with behavioral health conditions are underserved in Nevada; Identify barriers and describe several ways to overcome the barriers that may have decreased access to kept them away from meeting the behavioral health needs of Medicare enrollees; Identify several strategies behavioral health providers in Nevada can increase access to Medicare enrollees through their centers; Identify key activities to make services to Medicare enrollees sustainable for Nevada providers.

4 CEHs
In Person Training
Is Medicare a Missed Opportunity In Nevada’s Behavioral Health System?
Location: UNR Redfield Campus, 18600 Wedge Parkway, Reno, NV 89511
7/19/2019

Nationwide, community behavioral health providers have not impacted Medicare beneficiaries to the extent they have for Medicaid enrollees. This has often left Medicare beneficiaries with low access to behavioral health care, despite recent policy changes designed to expand access to people with behavioral health conditions age 65 and over who are dual eligible. Evidence shows that Medicare beneficiaries often have high prevalence of behavioral health conditions, including depression, substance use disorders, bipolar disorders and schizophrenia. Addressing these needs is necessary to increase the quality of life and reduce health care costs. Learning Objectives: Assess whether Medicare enrollees with behavioral health conditions are underserved in Nevada; Identify barriers and describe several ways to overcome the barriers that may have decreased access to kept them away from meeting the behavioral health needs of Medicare enrollees; Identify several strategies behavioral health providers in Nevada can increase access to Medicare enrollees through their centers; Identify key activities to make services to Medicare enrollees sustainable for Nevada providers.

Nationwide, community behavioral health providers have not impacted Medicare beneficiaries to the extent they have for Medicaid enrollees. This has often left Medicare beneficiaries with low access to behavioral health care, despite recent policy changes designed to expand access to people with behavioral health conditions age 65 and over who are dual eligible. Evidence shows that Medicare beneficiaries often have high prevalence of behavioral health conditions, including depression, substance use disorders, bipolar disorders and schizophrenia. Addressing these needs is necessary to increase the quality of life and reduce health care costs. Learning Objectives: Assess whether Medicare enrollees with behavioral health conditions are underserved in Nevada; Identify barriers and describe several ways to overcome the barriers that may have decreased access to kept them away from meeting the behavioral health needs of Medicare enrollees; Identify several strategies behavioral health providers in Nevada can increase access to Medicare enrollees through their centers; Identify key activities to make services to Medicare enrollees sustainable for Nevada providers.

Highlighted Resources

6 CEHs
In Person Training
Foundations in Working with Psychosis
Location: UNR Cooperative Extension Southern Area, 8050 Paradise Road, Las Vegas 89123
10/21/2019

Addresses understanding the symptoms of psychosis, and focuses a therapeutic approach that is can be used alongside the medical medication-management model. ...

Addresses understanding the symptoms of psychosis, and focuses a therapeutic approach that is can be used alongside the medical medication-management model. ...

6 CEHs
In Person Training
Groups and Group Processing Skills
Location: UNR Cooperative Extension Southern Area, 8050 Paradise Road, Las Vegas 89123
9/25/2019

The power of group processing in healing and treatment has been consistently supported in research. This workshop will consider strategies presented by SAMHSA/CSAT TIP 41, Irvin Yalom’s The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy and current research with an emphasis on application to substance use disorder treatment in group settings. In addition we will consider the role that the stages of change model and motivational interviewing can play in group therapy. Learning Objectives: Participants will consider how they can apply principles of effective group processes in their specific work environment; Participants will consider their perspective and the perspective of group participants; Participants will consider what makes group work effective and what may reduce group work effectiveness; Participants will consider group stages and how they can effectively respond to them; Participants will consider Yalom's view of "problem group members" and potential strategies to respond to these group members.

The power of group processing in healing and treatment has been consistently supported in research. This workshop will consider strategies presented by SAMHSA/CSAT TIP 41, Irvin Yalom’s The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy and current research with an emphasis on application to substance use disorder treatment in group settings. In addition we will consider the role that the stages of change model and motivational interviewing can play in group therapy. Learning Objectives: Participants will consider how they can apply principles of effective group processes in their specific work environment; Participants will consider their perspective and the perspective of group participants; Participants will consider what makes group work effective and what may reduce group work effectiveness; Participants will consider group stages and how they can effectively respond to them; Participants will consider Yalom's view of "problem group members" and potential strategies to respond to these group members.

1 CEHs
Online Video
Improving MAT Access and Quality Through Collaborative Care: The CoOp Model
Location: Online
Anytime

Medication assisted treatments (MAT) enhance opioid use disorder treatment efficacy, yet remain underutilized. Opioid treatment programs (OTPs) can now dispense buprenorphine or naltrexone as well as methadone. Collaboration between OTPs and office-based buprenorphine (OBB) prescribers constitutes a cohesive model providing access to comprehensive services, and encouraging MAT prescribing. During this webinar Dr. Stoller will focus on a model of care he coined “Collaborative Opioid Prescribing (CoOP),” linking OTP expertise with OBB prescribers. The OTP provides assessment, buprenorphine induction, and counseling, while OBB physicians provide ongoing buprenorphine prescribing and somatic or psychiatric care. An adaptive stepped care model adjusts counseling intensity and medication parameters (OBB prescription vs. OTP dispensing; duration of prescriptions). Supporting OBB providers in this manner may encourage MAT provision and access, while concurrently improving treatment outcome. Providing a broad spectrum of medical, social, and recovery services through coordinated care can enhance health outcomes and address unmet patient needs.

Medication assisted treatments (MAT) enhance opioid use disorder treatment efficacy, yet remain underutilized. Opioid treatment programs (OTPs) can now dispense buprenorphine or naltrexone as well as methadone. Collaboration between OTPs and office-based buprenorphine (OBB) prescribers constitutes a cohesive model providing access to comprehensive services, and encouraging MAT prescribing. During this webinar Dr. Stoller will focus on a model of care he coined “Collaborative Opioid Prescribing (CoOP),” linking OTP expertise with OBB prescribers. The OTP provides assessment, buprenorphine induction, and counseling, while OBB physicians provide ongoing buprenorphine prescribing and somatic or psychiatric care. An adaptive stepped care model adjusts counseling intensity and medication parameters (OBB prescription vs. OTP dispensing; duration of prescriptions). Supporting OBB providers in this manner may encourage MAT provision and access, while concurrently improving treatment outcome. Providing a broad spectrum of medical, social, and recovery services through coordinated care can enhance health outcomes and address unmet patient needs.